Connect with us

Education

Assessment on LASUSTECH, Getting it right from the start

Published

on

The world over, academic excellence is typically an offshoot of endogenous and enduring culture that has immunity against compromise, but mutation to classic global best practices. This has always been the benchmark that many universities are struggling to catch up with, while many others have considered this rare feat as a sprint and not a marathon.

The outcome of personal research has shown that, designing an evolving and adaptable academic culture requires critical thinking that is capable of espousing need-oriented courses and robust curricula, 360-degree touchpoint digital automation, technology-driven teaching and learning, versatile and creative administration, qualitative manpower, dynamic policy formulation, collaboration and networking, strict internal and external regulations, adequate and purposive funding, branding and Public Relations for Marketing (PRM) and ultimately the mindset of excellence by all stakeholders.

Now that the transmutation of the Lagos State Polytechnic (LASPOTECH) to Lagos State University of Science and Technology (LASUSTECH) has been consummated, the next phase of the process should be to take the advantage of starting afresh into laying the foundation of a specialized university that would become the pride of Lagos and Africa at large. It is possible and in our time too.

Considering the peculiarity of the university, starting with the existing programmes of the former polytechnic to keep people’s jobs won’t be a bad idea. Looking at the bigger picture, this university will need to do a Skill Gap Assessment – what are the industry’s first line needs? Skillsets versus current and emerging ‘need sets’. The Knowledge Gap Deficiencies (KGD) must give way to a systemic approach in the Productive Science and Technology (PS&T) model that is not only unique but 100% result-oriented. There must also be an environmental scanning of the immediate community to determine the relevant courses and programmes that are community needed. These two needs assessments would help the university to define and develop its core competencies from the beginning. The fourth industrial revolution (industry 4.0) as the current and developing environment for disruptive technologies and trends such as the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, virtual reality (VR), and artificial intelligence (AI), among others, must be considered. For the community and Lagos as a whole, the university should consider programmes like Ferry Fabrication and Services Technology (Marine Technology); AgriTech and Post-Harvest Processing Technology; Digital Transformation Technology; Integrated Waste Management and Recycling Technology; Alternative/ Renewable Energy Production Technology; Oil and Gas Supports Technology. This is the era of nanotechnology, we can do it.

Advertisement
ALSO READ  84 Nile varsity graduates bag first class

Automating the whole system, including the management of the new university is key. From admission to graduation, the process must be seamless. One digital solution should connect payments, registration, result processing, administration, information dissemination, library services, etc. No loopholes must be allowed. In this new university, there should not be missing scripts or results. Result, certificate, and transcripts should be ready in less than 72 hours upon request, yes, it is possible. 24/7 internet facilities and handshake with big tech firms would go a long way to position the institution.

Teaching and learning must have a technology interface. This is not a conventional university of marker and board, 70 percent of the learning process must be demonstrated if we must do anything differently. Up to the Ph.D. level (it is the new direction), attention must be given to hands-on practical demonstrations. Only modern and digital laboratories, studios, workshops, and classrooms can deliver the desired results as seen in a well-educated cultured society.

The drivers of LASUSTECH must be able to think like there is no box anywhere. Creativity and ingenuity should guide the administration of the new university. There must be an enduring line of ideation and curation. The principal officers must be fired for excellent development in all forms. In the same vein, if the government is really genuine in setting a standard for this university, the members of the Governing Council must be a mix of blue-chip captains, boardroom technocrats, industry experts, technophiles, philanthropists, and education enthusiasts. This very council should not be made a retirement plan for tired hands. And the university must not be made a dumping ground for the unqualified job-seeking family, friends, and associates. Relying on school fees to undergo a substantial development is no more in vogue, therefore, the business arm of the university must wake up to its responsibility to drive development, while maintenance culture must be entrenched in the core value of the institution.

ALSO READ  Convocation: Unilorin graduates 450 students with 1st class

Skilling, reskilling, upskilling, research, and development are very essential in defining qualitative manpower for the university. Emotional Intelligence (EI) and the excellent mindset of a goal-getter are equally of great importance. Knowledge of what to teach and the skill to teach right would be more appreciated if the lecturers put students at the centre of teaching. Other staff must have a total reorientation to understand that students are customers and kings in their right. To achieve excellence, there must be a systemic adoption of excellent culture across the board.

In making policy, the drivers of the new university may have to borrow some quality templates from the best universities. Policies like the Graduate on Time (GOT) system that guides against lecturer frustrating a student with extra year(s) or unserious student overstaying the period of graduation would be a welcome development. Students accessing lecturers performance and completing progress reports per semester before they (students) can access results is going to improve standards. Digitally monitored compulsory 75 percent attendance and regular use of customized mail/digital wallet would encourage seriousness and dedication. Policies should be made flexible and people-oriented. The Directorate of Students’ Affairs (DSA) should have a policy document that takes care of the students’ welfare, sporting activities, complaints, and graduation.

Advertisement

This is the era of collaboration, co-creation, and networking. LASUSTECH needs to stretch the hands of fellowship to partner universities (home & abroad) for students and staff exchange programmes. The university must also be ready to have a strong tie with the industry, foreign embassies, politicians, government at all levels to attract research grants, chairs, endowments, bursary, and donations.

Aside the statutory National University Commission (NUC) accreditation exercise, the internal and external assessment should be carried out regularly and diligently. The Annual Performance Evaluation (APER) must be holistic and watertight. As part of the culture that must be established from now, only journal articles on Scopus Journal Metrics or indexed journals should be allowed. Inventions, Innovations, creations, and ideations should also be considered for promotion. The OSAE visit should go beyond inspection; it should include government accreditation with well-crafted Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).

ALSO READ  Why we gave ABU N1bn to pay electricity debt — FG

There should be the immediate design of a brand strategy that must take care of the rebranding, repositioning, and internal /external communication architecture- brand manual. The ergonomics design of the campus must be fascinating. We are in the woke era, issues should not be allowed to snowball into a crisis. Response time to students’ distress must be swift and effective. Internal communication is as important as external communication, therefore, there must be a structured conflict resolution mechanism, community and government relations.

Lastly, the government must be ready to fund every aspect of the university or give it complete autonomy. It will be easier to partner with firms like Google, Microsoft, among others, to enhance the smooth operation of the university. Apart from the overhead cost, recurrent expenditure, and cost of accreditation, Lagos State Education Trust Fund should aggressively look into infrastructural development, capacity building, research and development, software acquisitions for all Lagos state-owned universities, such as Turnitin, Nvivo, IBM SPSS, ATLAS.ti, RStudio, Orange, Base SAS, OriginPro, TIMI Suite, etc.

As the summary of my piece, I wish to leave stakeholders of the new university with the Times Higher Education for university rankings which, calibrated 13 performance indicators into five areas: Teaching (the learning environment); Research (volume, income, and reputation); Citations (research influence); International outlook (staff, students and research); and Industry income (knowledge transfer).

Advertisement

Steven Anu’ Adesemoye is a researcher in the Department Of Media and Communications, University of Malaysia.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Education

Two new varsities to be approved next week – NUC

Published

on

The National Universities Commission said plans are being concluded to announce the establishment of two new universities in the country which will further bring the total number of institutions in the country to 272.

The commission’s acting Executive Secretary, Chris Maiyaki, said this during an interaction with journalists in Abuja on Thursday.

Maiyaki said the NUC would continue to approve new universities to cater for the admissions gap in the country.
He noted that while about two million candidates seek admission into universities every year, the total available quota for admission range between 500,000 and 700,000.

Maiyaki’s stance comes amidst the fight of the Academic Staff Union of Universities and other stakeholders in the tertiary education sub-sector against the proliferation of institutions in the country by the government at the Federal and State levels.

Advertisement

Stakeholders on numerous occasions said the establishment of new universities amidst poor funding of existing ones was not the way to go and hence had called on the government and the NUC to halt approvals given to new public universities.

“We have no choice but to as a matter of deliberate policy undertake the massification of universities,” Maiyaki said.

He said what separates the developed today from other countries is the level of investments in education.

Maiyaki said every year, almost two million candidates seek admission into the universities but only between 500,000 and 700,000 students get admitted.

He said, “You need to see the anguish and the frustration on the faces of families who are desperate to make sure that their children attend university education every admission session. It is very tough and challenging for university leaders and NUC and so we have no choice but to continue to approve the universities.

Advertisement
ALSO READ  International education day: How NGO educated 33 students on peaceful coexistence

“The approval for two more varsities to bring the number of universities in the country to 272 has been concluded and will be announced next week.”

He maintained that Nigeria will continue to widen universities’ access by approving more universities to meet its demands and supply of quality education.

While noting that countries like Brazil, Indonesia and others who have a population not up to Nigeria have more than 1,000 universities, he said efforts were ongoing to reposition the university system through transnational education by allowing foreign varsities to come in and operate in the country.

The Executive Secretary said the commission is presently processing applications for the establishment of distance learning centres that will be monitored to provide quality education.

The NUC boss, however, stressed that it does not mean the era of establishing distance learning centres is back.

Advertisement

Reacting to a statement by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission inviting proprietors of private universities and other institutions of higher learning in Nigeria to charge fees in dollars, he said no tertiary institutions is allowed to charge tuition fees in dollars.

He said the commission had made an inquiry into the allegation and thus investigated but discovered that the said private university was not charging fees in dollars.

“On the dollarisation of tuition fees in this said university, we have investigated it and the university is not charging fees in dollars.

They only charge dollars to foreign students. So I want the media to join hands with us to tell the public that no Nigeria university is allowed to charge fees in dollars,” he said.

ALSO READ  NTIC Rewards National Mathematics Competition Winners With Scholarships, Cash Prizes

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Education

NYSC Has Stopped Posting Corps Members To ‘Very Unsafe States’ – FG

Published

on

The Federal Government said members of the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) are no longer posted to states deemed unsafe in the wake of worsening security conditions in the country.

Several corps members have been abducted in some parts of the country during their one-year mandatory national service, raising fears about the sustainability of the scheme.

But the Minister of Youth Jamila Ibrahim says the scheme has taken steps to secure NYSC members including posting them only to safe states.

“As an immediate intervention of the government and the NYSC as an agency, we have actually stopped posting corps members to the very unsafe states,” Jamila said on Channels Television’s current affairs show Sunday Politics.

Advertisement

“We have been doing it. We have been doing it in the past. There are states we have not been posting corps members to to ensure their safety,” she added.

According to her, the security of corps members requires collaboration with other agencies of government.

“When it comes to security matters, it is a multi-sectoral approach. So, it is not the NYSC alone and the ministry that is involved. We are working with security outlets to ensure corps members are safe,” the minister maintained.

“We are also working on group transportation strategies for them to ensure that they are transported to and from camps safely and to their destinations.”

The minister said the Federal Government is working on reforming the NYSC scheme to reflect the present realities of the nation, particularly in the area of their allowance.

Advertisement
ALSO READ  Adeleke, Oyetola trade words over out-of-school children

“When it comes to remuneration, we are looking at the holistic funding of the NYSC. You are all aware that we have announced a reform of the NYSC scheme itself. We want the scheme to go beyond being a social programme of the government,” she added.

“The reforms will actually transform the NYSC into a revenue-generating agency and prepare corps members for the job market…”

Continue Reading

Education

International education day: How NGO educated 33 students on peaceful coexistence

Published

on

In a concerted effort to promote education as a powerful tool for fostering peaceful coexistence among students, the visionary leader/ Executive Director of Julebrama Women and Children Initiative (JUWACI), a nongovernmental organisation, Mrs, Jennifer Hembafan Alih has treated 33 students to a vibrant event on the International Day of Education.

In a statement, Mrs Alih gave the breakdown of the students to include 16 girls and 17 boys, adding that the event was held at Junior Secondary School Karamajigi, Abuja.

The theme of the event was, “Learning for Peace”.

According to the statement, “the theme of the day, “Learning for Peace,” provided insights that ignited contemplation among the gathered students and it emphasised education as a catalyst for fostering peaceful coexistence.

Advertisement

“For health and hygiene insights, the session empowered the students with valuable insights into maintaining a healthy lifestyle and creating a hygienic environment.

“A captivating drama unfolded, showcasing effective conflict resolution strategies within a school setting. Two students actively participated, embodying the principles elucidated during the event.

“A volunteer, took the opportunity to introduce JUWACI to the students with an engaging presentation which illuminated the organisation’s commitment to education, health, and empowerment initiatives.

“To infuse a sense of joy and camaraderie, there was an organised lively game that brought smiles to the faces of the children. Tokens and rewards for the game winners added an element of excitement.

“Attendees, including teachers and students, were treated to souvenirs and refreshments as tokens of appreciation. A heartwarming group photograph captured the shared enthusiasm and unity of purpose.

Advertisement
ALSO READ  Why we gave ABU N1bn to pay electricity debt — FG

“In a thoughtful gesture toward sustainable school management, JUWACI donated a dustbin to Junior Secondary School in Karamajigi. The contribution reflects the organisation’s commitment to fostering a clean and conducive learning environment.

“The International Day of Education celebration at Junior Secondary School Karamajigi not only imparted valuable knowledge but also fostered a spirit of unity and empowerment among the students.

“JUWACI remains dedicated to nurturing young minds for a future marked by peace, knowledge, and positive change”.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2022 TheHeute.